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Diwali Special Angoori Gulab Jamun – Made with Sooji // No Deep-Frying

Diwali Special Angoori Gulab Jamun – Made with Sooji // No Deep-Frying

The festival of Diwali is incomplete without some lip-smacking gulab jamuns. Am I right? And it is even more special when it is homemade. These Angoori Gulab Jamun are very easy to make, don’t need a lot of ingredients, and best of all – these are not deep-fried. How do they taste? Well, you can’t tell the difference. These are soft and have a melt-in-the-mouth texture. And with such a tiny bite size, you can’t count how many you have eaten. 😀

Other Indian sweets and dessert recipes that you can try – Rasmalai (made from Haldiram Rasgullas), Baked Mawa Gujiya, Shahi Tukda (no deep-frying), and vegan kheer.

Story Time

I always wanted to make non-fried gulab jamuns. And when I bought my Appe Pan, there was no stopping. I had to try it. But little did I know that it was going to be that difficult. I attempted several times to master this recipe. In the process, we both had quite a lot of gulab jamuns. No regrets though. 😀

Initially, they all burnt and had patches of different colors. Some areas were white while some were black. Some had distorted shapes while some developed cracks. And once they were so hard that even the sugar syrup couldn’t get through them. But you know what, they all tasted good. I can say this because we finished them all. After one or two months of regular practice, finally I made it. I made soft, smooth, and delicious Non-Fried Gulab Jamuns.

gulab jamun
My first attempt

What is Gulab Jamun?

Gulab Jamun is a traditional Indian sweet (or dessert) that is made especially during the festival of Holi and Diwali. It is made with different ingredients like paneer (cottage cheese), sooji, milk powder, khoya, etc. To make these gulab jamuns, a soft and lump-free mixture is prepared which is then shaped into small balls. These balls are then deep-fried until golden brown and then soaked in sugar syrup. This is one of my all-time favorite Indian Mithais (sweets) which I always make during the festive season.

What is Angoori Jamun?

Angoori Jamun is a mini or bite-size Gulab Jamun. The only difference between Angoori Jamun and Gulab Jamun is the size. Regular gulab jamun is the size of a table tennis ball while Angoori Jamun is the size of angoor (grapes).

Tips to make it right

Gulab Jamun seems easy but there are certain tips that you need to keep in mind to make them just perfect otherwise it is very easy to ruin this delicacy.

  1. Do not over-knead the dough. Over-kneading results in hard gulab jamuns.
  2. The dough or the mixture should neither be very hard nor soft. The hard dough will develop cracks while frying and the soft dough will lose its shape.
  3. If the dough is too soft, dust it with some milk powder and then knead. If it is too hard, knead it with a little bit of milk or water.
  4. Apply some ghee on your palm while shaping. It makes a smooth ball and prevents cracking.
  5. Cook on low flame and keep on flipping otherwise they may burn.
  6. Make sure the sugar syrup (chashni) is lukewarm – neither hot nor cold. Hot sugar syrup disturbs the shape of gulab jamuns and cold sugar syrup doesn’t seep in well.

How to make sugar syrup (chashni) for Gulab Jamun?

Making sugar syrup is quite easy but at times it gets tricky too. Initially, it was difficult for me to understand the one-thread or two-thread method of making the sugar syrup. The below steps will help you make a perfect and hassle-free sugar syrup for gulab jamuns.

  1. Add water and sugar syrup to a saucepan and heat until the sugar is dissolved.
  2. Once the sugar is dissolved, let it heat for another 5 minutes. The sugar syrup will be ready.
  3. To test, take a drop of it and rub it between your fingers. It should feel sticky and greasy (not watery).

How to store gulab jamun?

You can store these gulab jamuns at room temperature for around 3 to 4 days (depending on the temperature where you live). Refrigerate for longer shelf life. In the refrigerator, they can easily last for a week or maybe 10 days.

Do not consume them if they taste sour.

Benefits of opting for non-fried methods

If you are someone like me who doesn’t like deep frying food unless it is very much necessary for the recipe like when I am making Chhole poori or Bhaturas. I just can’t make them without deep frying. So, I saved my deep-frying quota only for these couple of recipes. Otherwise, I always prefer baking or if possible Appe Pan.

I made many deep-fried recipes healthier by opting for a better cooking method. You must try our Baked Pani Puri, Spring Rollsdum aloovada pavGobhi Manchurian & baked cheese balls. I made them healthier with no compromise on the taste.

Now, here are the reasons I don’t deep fry (until necessary):

  1. Deep-fried food feels heavy and oily after eating it.
  2. The non-Fried methods instead of deep frying make you feel that you are opting for healthier options.
  3. The biggest reason of all is that the oil becomes unhealthy after reaching the temperature of deep-frying. We are not supposed to use the oil again for cooking. But obviously, we can’t even discard the oil. So we consume it. That’s where switching to a non-fried method helps.
  4. The non-fried method is much easier and hassle-free. There is no tension of ruining the oil if any gulab jamun breaks. Or even if they have cracks, no extra oil will seep in.

Non Fried Gulab jamun

Ingredients List – for your reference

Angoori Gulab Jamun

Cooking Method – for quick reference

Sugar Syrup

Angoori Gulab Jamun

Dough

Angoori Gulab Jamun

Angoori Gulab Jamun

Frying in Appe Pan

Angoori Gulab Jamun

Is this recipe vegan-friendly?

Yes. Of course. You can simply replace cow milk with any plant-based milk, preferably almond milk. Instead of ghee, use plant-based ghee, vegan butter, or coconut oil.

More Diwali Recipes – just as good

  1. Baked Pani Puri
  2. Rasmalai (made with Haldiram’s Rasgulla)
  3. Danedar Besan Ladoo
  4. Palak Paneer Cutlets
  5. Coconut Ladoo

I have a blog with more than 30 Diwali recipes. You can check that out here.

Now grab all the ingredients because you are ready to make this delicious traditional Indian sweet or dessert recipe at home. If you try this recipe & like it too, please share the photo of your creation on Instagram and tag us @thefearlesscooking. We just love to see your recreation of our recipes.

Happy Cooking 🙂

Love from us

Richa

Diwali Special Angoori Gulab Jamun – Made with Sooji // No Deep-Frying

Non-Fried. Divine. Mouth-Watering.

Diwali is incomplete without some lip-smacking Gulab Jamuns and when they are homemade and bite-size then you even stop counting the numbers. Try this easy and yummy Angoori Jamun made with sooji. 

50

Servings

10 min

Prep Time

50 min

Cook Time

1 hr

Total Time

Courses

Cuisines


Ingredients

Sugar Syrup

Dough

Other

Steps

Sugar Syrup
  1. Add sugar, water, and saffron to a saucepan and heat until sugar is dissolved.
  2. Once the sugar is dissolved, let it heat for another 5 to 7 minutes on medium flame. 
  3. Test by taking a drop of it and rubbing it between your fingers. It should feel sticky and greasy (not watery). Switch off the flame. 
  4. If you check, it will form one thread between your fingers.
  5. Add cardamom powder to it. Mix and cover. Keep it aside while we prepare the dough.
Dough
  1. Add milk to a saucepan. Boil. 
  2. Once milk starts to boil, add sooji and stir continuously to avoid lumps. Lower the flame. 
  3. Keep stirring until it forms a dough, 3 to 4 min. 
  4. Add 1/4 Tsp ghee and mix well. The dough will leave the edges and come together. 
  5. Take out the dough on a slab and start kneading. Make sure it is not very hot because that may burn your hands. Apply some water to your hands and knead, about 5 to 6 minutes.
  6. Apply some ghee and knead. The dough will come together and become smooth. Cover it with a damp cloth and let it rest for 10 minutes. 
Shaping and Frying
  1. Divide the dough into 4 parts. Roll one part of the dough on the slab into a thin cylindrical shape. Cut into small pieces. 
  2. Keep the rest of the dough covered with a damp cloth to prevent them from drying.
  3. Roll and shape each piece into a tiny ball. Apply some ghee to your palms for a smooth texture. Repeat the same for the remaining dough.
  4. In total, you will have around 50 tiny balls.
  5. To fry them, heat your Appe Pan (mini-pancake pan) on medium-low flame. Brush ghee on each mold. 
  6. Place your prepared balls in each mold and brush ghee on them. Keep flipping and fry them evenly until golden brown. 
  7. I prefer to fry 6 to 7 at a time. That is easier to manage.
  8. Once they are golden brown all over, remove them from the pan and drop them in the lukewarm sugar syrup. 
  9. If the sugar syrup is cold, reheat.
  10. Repeat the same with each ball and then let them rest for a couple of hours so that they absorb the sugar syrup. 
  11. Once they are done, they will be soft and juicy. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. Make sure the sugar syrup is lukewarm. The hot syrup will crumble the balls and cold syrup will not seep inside them.  
  2. Do not over-knead the dough. The Angoori jamun will become hard.
  3. Reheat while serving or enjoy them cold. 
  4. The recipe will make around 50 pieces which can easily serve 10 to 15 people. 

FAQs

What is Gulab Jamun?
+

Gulab Jamun is a traditional Indian sweet (or dessert) that is made especially during the festival of Holi and Diwali. It is made with different ingredients like paneer (cottage cheese), sooji, milk powder, khoya, etc. To make these gulab jamuns, a soft and lump-free mixture is prepared which is then shaped into small balls. These balls are then deep-fried until golden brown and then soaked in sugar syrup. This is one of my all-time favorite Indian Mithais (sweets) which I always make during the festive season.


What is Angoori Jamun?
+

Angoori Jamun is a mini or bite-size Gulab Jamun. The only difference between Angoori Jamun and Gulab Jamun is the size. Regular gulab jamun is the size of a table tennis ball while Angoori Jamun is the size of angoor (grapes).


How to store gulab jamun?
+
You can store these gulab jamuns at room temperature for around 3 to 4 days (depending on the temperature where you live). Refrigerate for longer shelf life. In the refrigerator, they can easily last for a week or maybe 10 days. Do not consume them if they taste sour.

Is this recipe vegan-friendly?
+
Yes. Of course. You can simply replace cow milk with any plant-based milk, preferably almond milk. Instead of ghee, use plant-based ghee, vegan butter, or coconut oil.

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