Blog

Breakfast

Dessert

Drink

Main

Snack

< 30 Minute

Baking

Vegan

UP Special Summer Meal – Sattu Paratha

UP Special Summer Meal – Sattu Paratha

Summers and stuffed parathas don’t generally match that well. But this stuffed paratha is different. It is made especially during the summertime because this ingredient – sattu (roasted black chana flour) – gives you the energy and recharges you after an exhausting summer heat.

This North Indian delicacy (traditionally from Uttar Pradesh) tastes amazing with Aamras and this is another reason that it is served during the summer season. Try this meal over lunch, brunch, or dinner, and have an amazing time savoring this delicious and fulfilling meal.

Story Time

Being from Uttar Pradesh, India, sattu (roasted black chana flour) had always been an essential ingredient in my home while I was growing up. I have some really fond memories related to it which I still remember and cherish.

I remember during the summer vacations we all used to sleep after having lunch. By we, I mean my mom and my three siblings which includes my two sisters and one little brother. And when we wake up and feel sweaty, hot, and lethargic, my mom used to prepare this simple thing – sattu dissolved in cold water and sugar. It is so simple and still became our everyday comfort food. It feels cooling, gives a boost of energy, and tastes amazing too. Just like having a dessert. We actually started loving it so much that we even started having it as a dessert after meals. We loved it and still do. It creeps out Jatin though 😀 He doesn’t like the idea of having flour with water.

My mom used to share stories that how farmers in villages eat sattu roti or paratha during the summertime because it cools down their bodies and gives them a lot of energy too. After getting married, I made this for Jatin and he also loved these parathas. He enjoys it with some aloo tamatar ki sabji (potato curry), curd, and pickles.

If you don’t have much time, watch the video instead. If you enjoy the video, Please Subscribe to our youtube channel.

What is Sattu?

Sattu is flour made out of roasted black chana, containing the flour of the grain along with its skin. It is quite popular in the Northern part of India, especially in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. It is quite nutritious and rich in proteins and has a cooling effect. That is why it is often consumed in the summer season. In some parts of India like Bihar, it is simply mixed with water and some seasonings and consumed as a savory drink. It is used to prepare some delicacies like ladoos, litti chokha (Rajasthani delicacy).

These days, we find it all throughout the year and it is made by mixing different kinds of pulses and cereals. It is often used in vegetarian cuisines.

Tips to make it right

Stuffed parathas have just two elements – dough and stuffing. There are certain things that you need to keep in mind while working on them.

1 – Dough

Stuffed parathas need a soft dough. If it is hard, the stuffing will start to come out while rolling. If it is too soft, it doesn’t do any harm, but the dough becomes a little difficult to manage. Are you wondering what is soft dough? Hmmmm…This is something you learn with practice. You need to feel the dough to understand it. But if you are a beginner, don’t worry. Just press it with your fingers, and if it doesn’t resist, it is just perfect.

Dough
Kneading the dough

One thing you need to remember is that every ingredient is different. Every flour is different. Every flour has a different water absorption capacity. So, don’t follow the recipe blindly. Recipes are just a guide. You may need to adjust the quantity of water, as needed. Just remember, we need a Soft Dough.

Dough
A Soft Dough for Parathas

2 – Stuffing

This stuffing is quite easy to work with. It is dry and doesn’t have moisture which at times may tear the dough while rolling. If you are a beginner, this stuffed paratha will be easier for you to make.

Let the stuffing rest after mixing. This allows the vegetables to release their moisture and the dry stuffing becomes slightly moist and easy to stuff. DO NOT add any water because the stuffing becomes moist and wet quite easily. First, let it rest for a while and see how much moisture the vegetables have released. Generally, that is enough to make these parathas. In case, the stuffing feels dry, just drizzle a little bit of water and mix.

Is this recipe vegan?

Yes. This stuffed paratha is vegan and plant-based. Generally, the stuffed parathas are made with ghee or butter. But to make it vegan, I cooked them with some oil.

You must also try our stuffed aloo paratha (potato stuffed flat bread), spring onion paratha, and radish leaves parathas. They all taste amazing. You will love them.

How to serve Sattu Parathas?

There are many ways you can enjoy it.

  1. Hot Tea/Chai
  2. Indian Pickles
  3. Butter (homemade preferably)
  4. Boondi Raita
  5. Aloo Tamatar Sabji (Potato Curry)

Now grab all the ingredients because you are ready to make this recipe. Enjoy it over lunch, dinner or weekend brunch. If you like the recipe and try it too, please share the photo on Instagram and tag us too @thefearlesscooking. We just love to see your recreation of our recipes.

Happy Cooking.

Love from us

Richa & Jatin

UP Special Summer Meal – Sattu Paratha

Wholesome. Filling. Vegan.

A perfect summer recipe to keep you filled and energetic. Sattu Paratha is the easiest of all the stuffed parathas because you can't mess it up. You can over-stuff and still, they won't tear. 

Try & Enjoy this wholesome Summer Meal. 

8

Servings

30 min

Prep Time

20 min

Cook Time

50 min

Total Time

Courses


Ingredients

Dough

Stuffing

Other

Steps

Knead Dough
  1. In a bowl, add whole wheat flour and salt. Mix. 
  2. Add 1/4 cup of water at a time and mix it well using a spatula or spoon. Keep adding a little water till dry flour comes together.
  3. Leave the spoon and start kneading with the hands. Sprinkle more water, if needed to make a soft dough. 
  4. If the dough gets wet and sticky, dust some flour. If it feels dry, sprinkle a little water.
  5. Make a smooth ball of the dough. Apply oil all over. Put it in the bowl, cover &amp; let it rest for 15 minutes. 
  6. Sometimes, I sprinkle a little water on top and let it rest. It absorbs the water and becomes very soft. Rolling becomes much easier this way.
Stuffing
  1. In a bowl, add all the ingredients and mix well. Let it rest for around 10 to 15 minutes so that the vegetables release their moisture and the stuffing becomes slightly moist. 
  2. If not rested, the stuffing will be dry.
  3. After 10 - 15 minutes, mix well and press some stuffing in your fist/palm. It should form a loose ball - not very crumbly or dry. 
  4. If the stuffing is very dry, sprinkle just a little bit of water to it.
Rolling
  1. Take a medium ball of the dough. Roll it between your palms and gently flatten it. 
  2. Put it on the rolling board (or on a flat surface/kitchen slab) and lightly dust with some flour all over.
  3. Roll it in a circular shape using a rolling pin (or any cylindrical bottle). You don't need to be perfect here. Just roll it to 4 to 5 inches diameter. 
  4. Lift it up and place it on your palm. 
  5. Put the stuffing at the centre. (The amount of stuffing should make a ball equal in size of the dough ball)
  6. In the case of sattu paratha, you can over-stuff it. Since there is no moisture in the filling, the parathas don't tear easily.
  7. Seal the edges. it will become semi-circular in shape. 
  8. Now take the two ends and seal them together. Press the joined top portion slightly downward from the centre. Pat it gently and flatten it a little. 
  9. It will form a patty shape.
  10. Place it on the rolling board, dust some flour all over. Start patting it gently and spread it in circular shape. Do it till it is 5 to 7 inches in diameter. 
  11. Doing with palms first makes it easier to roll in a circular shape.
  12. Then roll it with the rolling pin. Roll it as thin as you like your parathas. Make sure that the stuffing is not coming out. Once done, keep it on the side. 
  13. Dust some flour to avoid sticking.
  14. Repeat the same with the rest of the dough and stuffing. 
Cooking
  1. Heat a flat pan or tawa and place the rolled paratha on it. Keep the flame on medium-high.
  2. Cooking on low flame makes the parathas hard.
  3. After about 20-30 seconds, you will start noticing a change in the colour of the surface of paratha. Flip it.
  4. Brush some oil all over the surface. Flip again and brush some oil on the other surface too. 
  5. Press it with a spatula and cook from both sides. You will see some dark spots on the surface. It takes around 2 to 3 minutes to cook well. 
  6. Once it is done, serve right away. 
Serving Suggestion
  1. Serve it with aloo tamatar sabji (Potato Curry), boondi raita (curd), and pickles. These parathas also taste good with fresh aamras.

FAQs

What is Sattu?
+
Sattu is flour made out of roasted black chana. It contains the flour of the grain along with its skin. It is quite popular in the Northern part of India, especially in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. It is quite nutritious and rich in proteins. It has a cooling effect and that is why it is often consumed in the summer season. In some parts of India like Bihar, it is simply mixed with water and some seasonings and consumed as a savory drink. It is used to prepare some delicacies like ladoos, litti chokha (Rajasthani delicacy). These days, we find it all throughout the year and it is made by mixing different kinds of pulses and cereals. It is often used in vegetarian cuisines.

Is sattu same as besan?
+

No. Sattu and besan are as different as milk and curd. Sattu is a flour generally made of roasted unpeeled kala chana (black chickpeas) while besan is made of ground Bengal gram (chana dal). They both are from the same ingredient but still very a lot in taste. These days, you get sattu made of different kinds of roasted pulses and cereals.


Is kala chana same as chickpeas?
+

Kala chana is a kind of chickpeas only. Both are from the same family but differ a lot in shape, size, texture, and color. Kala chana (black chickpea) has black-colored skin while chickpeas have white-colored (white or pale) skin. Chickpeas are called chhole or safed chana in Hindi.


Is chickpea flour same as besan?
+

No. Chickpea flour and besan are as different as milk and curd. They both are from the same family but differ a lot in taste and texture. Chickpea flour is made of chickpea which is called chhole in Hindi. On the other hand, besan is made of Bengal gram (chana dal in Hindi). These flours are often used as same by most food bloggers or even by big companies. But they both are absolutely different.

Tell us what you think

Top